Ringlight fashion lighting

Alternative fashion shot with ringlight and two stripboxes
Lighting diagram showing the ringlight and the two softboxes

Magnus Svensson is back with another funky fresh lighting setup. The key light is a ringlight wich gives the very characteristic light and maybe most of all, a characteristic shadow if the model stands close to the background. There is also one stripbox on each side that gives the reflection in the glossy outfit.

Lighting setup for fashion photography

David Bicho is thinking BIG when he shoots fashon photos
A lighting diagram for fashion photography. All you need is basically a plastic wrapped building and a stripbox.

When doing bigger/wider lighting setups, the distances grow and ordinary soft boxes and such doesnt work since they become relatively small and creates harsh shadows. Then its great to use really BIG diffusors.

In this image we wrapped the whole exterior of the building in milky white plastic to get the huge windows like this. To get the correct depth of light from outside the window, the flash needs to be far away, thus demands alot of power. I think we used a twin head and two 2400Ws generators for the outside flash. Inside I had a strip light (without fabric) from the left shooting through a big diffusion screen. To the right there was a silver reflector that bounced back the light from a gridded flash. The reason why I bounced it was because I needed the extra depth of light one get when using long distances.

Jill Greenberg lighting setup and lighting diagram

David Bicho’s tribute to Jill Greenberg, using her characteristic lighting setup.
Lighting diagram explaining the Jill Greenberg lighting setup

This image is a pure tribute to the classic crying-images by Jill Greenberg. This is really showing the crisp and contrasty light of the beloved Profoto Giant (the huge umbrella). From the back, I use two strip lights and a hair light on a boom stand to create a “kicker” all around her silhouette. One gridded light on the black background (turns blue when white balancing to get nice skin tones). Just below the model there is a squared silver reflector (I hate round ones!) to give the classic extra lower clam-shellish-spark to the eye to give some feeling of “wet eyes”… To eliminate all unwanted indirect lightning, I used big black book ends to really push the contrast by lowering the levels in the shadows.

Visit photographer David Bicho for more great inspiration.

Product lighting setup for everyone

Impressive product photography using a minimum lighting setup.

As you can see in the lighting diagram, all you need is a flashlight for this lighting setup

This is a clever lighting method for product photography that doesn’t require much lighting equipment. A flashlight and a tripod. So it doesn’t matter if you are a professional photographer or a complete beginner, everyone can try this fantastic lighting setup. Use a 20-30 seconds shutter and then use the flashlight to paint the light on your object. Magnus Svensson definitely  masters this lighting technique as you can see above.

Glamour lighting with Helene Wiklund

Lusciuos glamour model Helene Wiklund from Sweden

Glamour lighting diagram

If you are into glamour photography and have already tried the golden umbrella thing and similar lighting setups, you can find new inspiration from Magnus Svensson here. The keylight is a large octabox, and then you kick some light from the smaller softboxes at both sides in the background. This gives you a glamour lighting with a slight touch of beauty lighting!

Fashion lighting setup on location

First class fashion photography doesn't necessarily require tons of lighting equipment.

Lighting diagram for fashion photography

This is a lighting setup for fashion photography on location. Using only sunlight and a reflector you can achieve amazing photos . We will soon publish more photos, lighting setups and lighting diagrams from Magnus Svensson. In the meanwhile, check out his portfolio at Maz Studios

Clam shell lighting setup for beauty shots

Beauty shots using the clam shell lighting setup.

Clam shell lighting diagram. Please notice that the softbox and reflector are NOT vertical as the lighting diagram insinuates.

Beauty lighting setups does not have to be difficult. You can easily get professional looking beauty shots using the clam shell lighting setup.

It’s called clam shell simply because you rig two softboxes as a giant gaping clam shell. It’s hard to see in the lighting diagram because of the levitated view. It would have been better illustrated if the lighting diagram was viewed from the side. Anyway, I think you get the idea.

A common setup is to build you’re clam shell with a larger upper softbox and then a lower smaller stripbox. The upper softbox is about one stop higher than the stripbox. Using two softboxes gives you good control of the light.

Simplified clam shell lighting setup

This specific clamshell lighting is simplified a bit. I used one big softbox from above and then a big horizontal silver reflector underneath. This gives you a little less control of the light, compared to using two softboxes, but the setup is about what you want anyway. The softbox will automatically give more light than the silver reflector. You can vary the distance between the soft box and the rector to control the light a bit. You can also try with a white reflector to find a lighting setup that you like.

Lighting setup using natural light and silver reflector

This is a photo portrait of the swedish professional dancer Karl Dyall. The lighting setup is very simple. The model is standing next to a big window which is about 4 feet from him on the right hand side. On the left hand side stands a silver reflector about 2 feet away. It was cloudy that day, so the light is very soft.  As many of you know is the Canon EF 50/1.8 II bokeh a bit stressful, so the warm light in the background is not as smooth as I would like it.

Natural light photography

When you practice natural light photography, keep in mind that the constant light from a silver reflector can be annoying for the model if the light is too intense. It makes it difficult for the model to keep a certain facial expression, and the whole workflow for the session will be affected.

If the light from the window would have been more intense that day, or if it had been an outdoor session a sunny day, I would probably have used a white reflector instead of a silver reflector.

Portrait lighting diagram with natural light and reflector