Reflector lighting setup

If you spot a good looking man standing in the sun, fold out your reflector and he will look even better.
The sunlight and a reflector is all you need to take beautiful photos like this.

Many of you already know London based photographer Cecilie Harris from some previously published lighting setups. Now she is back with some more of that great stuff, starting with a lighting setup using only a reflector.

Cecilia Harris: – For this shoot I actual had real sunlight to play with and not just light on an overcast day. This created some cool natural shadow and lighting effects, and unwanted shadows were easily filled with a reflector. The low f stop really helps bring the model in focus.

Backlight portrait lighting setup

Great make up and great lighting.
A octabox source from behind and a reflector from the side.

Here’s a simple but useful lighting setup from photographer Jessica Wikström.

Jessica: – The plan for this picture was to create a soft backlight but I changed my mind and got the reflector to lighten up the models face and get some more contrast into the picture.

Studio lighting setup

All lights on Rollergirl in this lighting setup.

Here is a studio lighting setup from photographer Hipolit Terpinsky. The key light is a softbox and the filler  is from a beauty dish. There are also two reflectors to kick up some some light.

All lights are on the model, so the backdrop is slightly underexposed which gives the photo a more dramatic expression.

Retro style portrait lighting setup

Classic retro style portrait
Lighting diagram for retro style portrait.

Hipolit Terpinsky gives this nifty little lighting setup to all you retro lovers out there. To add that extra classic movie star touch, put a cigarette in the models mouth, and load your camera with old school grainy black and white film (Ilford FP4).

But leave your flux capacitor at home.

High fashion lighting setup

Beautiful lighting setup for high fashion. Click image for full size.
High fashion lighting diagram.

Lighting For Photo legend David Bicho is back with a great lighting setup for high fashion. This is a pretty advanced lighting setup, but the result shows us that it’s worth all the effort.

David is also sharing a PDF of the assignment brief he wrote to the wardrobe stylist. It explains the mood, the story behind the photo etc.

wardrobe-stylist-assignment-brief

One-light beauty setup

A while ago I got this video tutorial from Santa Ana based photographer Sean Armenta. It’s a simple one-light beauty setup that gives stunning results.

There is no lighting diagram in this tutorial, but Sean explains very clearly how to set up the light, so you can easily use this lighing setup yourself.

There are also some other useful tips about make up, digital image editing and more. Enjoy!

Check out Sean’s blog for more inspiration and information about lighting and photography.

Swimwear fashion and background lighting

Great lighting setup for swimwear fashion photography
The lighting diagram shows that the fashion model stands in the light of the reflectors and not in the direct sunlight.

Eivind Røhne gives you a new great lighting setup.

This is another shot from our fashion trip to Sardegna/Sardinia in Italy. It was a rather cold morning, and we had quite a few bikinis and bathing suits to go through, so we had to work fast. When temperatures are low like this, both the models and clients appreciate it when the photographer can work fast like this. Both on commercial, editorial and catalogue fashion, because you have a lot of stuff to get through. Most of these swimwear shots were done at Hotel Ollastu in Olbia where we stayed during the whole period. It has a lot of wonderful locations and backgrounds, and was also a great place to stay.

We placed the model behind the wall down at the bungalows, so she would be in shade from the direct sun rising to the left in the picture. At the same time the sun created some nice patterns on the stone wall of the bungalow. But the problem was that the background behind the model, with the wall and especially the door, got very dark. Too dark actually. So I started by building up a nice light around the model first. Some people seem to think; reflector = subject, but they’re excellent and effective for lighting up the environment as well. So I set up a large California Sunbounce Pro zebra reflector quite far away, out in the sun. I angled it carefully so that no light from it was hitting the model, but lit up everything else behind her instead. A reflector like this literally throws a big wall of light when placed in direct sunlight, so you have to be careful with what it hits. And the effect is tremendous. You can see the doorframe almost glowing.

Then I set up another reflector on the model. This time a California Sunbounce Mini white. I placed it just out of camera frame, and angled it so it lit up her face and upper body. Her legs got some reflections from the light colored stone ground.

I metered the light on her face with my Sekonic L-358, and got f/5.6 and 1/60 at ISO 100. Shot on a medium format digital Hasselblad with a 210mm lens.

Really love reflectors and natural light in my fashion work!

Cheers!